Daughter of Eden

Daughter cover

The next and final Eden novel will be called Daughter of Eden.   (No publication date has been finalised as yet.)

As in Mother of Eden, the events in Daughter of Eden take place more than two centuries on from the events in Dark Eden, but on the opposite side of the great rift in the human society of Eden that occurred in the original book.

Mother of Eden was about Starlight Brooking’s experiences among the descendants of those who followed John Redlantern.  Daughter of Eden will follow Starlight’s childhood friend Angie among the Davidfolk, the descendants of those who remained loyal to John’s great enemy, David Redlantern.

Angie, who left her home to be become a shadowspeaker, will be present at two cataclysmic events that change the course of Eden’s history.

I think this book is the best thing I’ve yet done.

20 thoughts on “Daughter of Eden”

  1. Really really looking forward to this Chris. Love all your books, and Eden has sucked me in from the start. Hoping for more big reveals and surprises in this last of the trilogy inc. the bats and possible further tech/civ discovery. By the way was delighted to receive a copy of Mother of Eden signed by you due to the Kindle problem on its release. Many many thanks.

    Will keep checking back for news about date of publication.

  2. Chris,
    you just crushed me by stating, that Daughter of Eden is the final Eden novel. Eden is such a wonderful setting! I hoped to see how it will develop in centuries to come.

    Also I hoped so much that at one point people of Eden will meet people from Earth. I thought that it would be such an interesting thing to see through your writing. Decedents of John Redalantern so much in love in the concepts of Earth meeting people from Earth who would judge them by their appearance. That would be an emotional atomic bomb.

    Now I shake off the bad filling of having only one more visit to Eden and I wish you good writing.

    Your grateful reader,
    George

  3. Thanks George. Very kind of you. My feeling was that I should quit Eden while it was still alive and interesting to me.

    I won’t give anything else away about what will be in the 3rd and last novel. You’re not the first person to tell me what they would like to see in it. All I can say is that I probably won’t satisfy everyone but I feel myself that I’ve brought this series to a satisfing conclusion.

  4. Thank you Chris for your reply. As a reader I learned that even if I don’t get to see world I am reading about in the perspective I wanted, I still can take from the novel as much a as author is willing to give. I trust in your work. I am waiting so very impatiently!

  5. I literally finished Mother of Eden five minutes ago and immediately hit the internet to check whether there are any plans for a third novel. I am so excited and happy that it will be out so soon.
    By the way: Are there any plans for a German translation? I would love to buy it for my parents to read!

    Thank you so much for those two wonderful books!

  6. Thank you Raimund for taking the trouble to give me this feedback. Very much appreciated. No plans for a German translation as yet, I’m afraid. The only book of mine that’s currently available in German is The Holy Machine (Messias-Maschine).

  7. Two cataclysmic events, eh? Well, it’s clear what one of those will be. I wonder what the second will be though?

    Also, Mother of Eden is set *two centuries* later? I thought it was only 5 generations afterwards. Granted, the Headmen were probably Brightflame’s descendants, from when John was old old.

    But now there’s a wildcard group in the conflict between the Davidfolk and Johnfolk…

  8. Hi Chris,

    The first of your books I read was Dark Eden, and I have made my way through the rest since then. I’ve honestly enjoyed each of them, and ended up on this site looking for any titles I may have missed. I’m thrilled you will write another Eden book. Thanks for sharing your work, and all the best with writing the final Eden.

    Renee

  9. Thanks very much Renee. Daughter of Eden is written, and should be out in the summer, though I do not yet have an exact release date,

  10. I just wanted to reiterate what others have said, that I love Eden as a setting and hope the urge to write more comes back in time! I would love to see an Eden enlightenment period.

  11. Thanks Nicktopus. Daughter is the last one planned, but who knows? I like the world myself, and become so inured in writing it that I have to remind myself not to double up adjectives all the time when doing other kinds of writing. An Eden enlightenment is certainly a fascinating thought.

  12. I just discovered the announcement of Daughter og Eden on http://www.risingshadow.net. Great news! According to information on amazon.co.uk it seems that the book is only to be released in kindle edition. If so: Sad news! Both the preceeding books I have in 1st ed. HC. I hope it’s just amazon.co.uk that is speaking non-sense again. There will be a HC edition, right? Please, pretty please?

    🙂 Roald

  13. Thanks for your enthusiasm Roald! Amazon has got it wrong (often does at this stage). Daughter of Eden won’t just come out on kindle.

  14. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed both books, Chris, and very much look forward to the third. For me, one of the most interesting features of these books is how you develop myth/belief through the story. As a Christian I find this particularly fascinating and wondered if you have intentionally used the world of Eden to critique religion?

  15. Thanks David. I’m not sure I’d describe myself as critiquing religion so much as exploring the way people use origin stories as a way of giving some meaning to their lives. The original story of the Garden of Eden is a great example of this, but I think we do it all the time.

    It interests me that, one account of the etymology of the word ‘religion’ is that it comes from a Latin word meaning something like ‘reconnect’. The original Eden story provides a kind of explanation (not being a Christian myself I do not see it as THE explanation) for a kind of rift that is part of human experience: a sense of a gap, a rupture, an absence. On the planet Eden, they understand this rift in terms of the severance of all contact between themselves andt he rest of the human community on Earth, and their stories seek both to explain and, to some extent, to heal this rupture, much as Christian theology does (and, I guess, the theology of other religions too).

  16. Thanks David. I’m not sure I’d describe myself as critiquing religion so much as exploring the way people use origin stories as a way of giving some meaning to their lives. The original story of the Garden of Eden is a great example of this, but I think we do it all the time.

    It interests me that, one account of the etymology of the word ‘religion’ is that it comes from a Latin word meaning something like ‘reconnect’. The original Eden story provides a kind of explanation (not being a Christian myself I do not see it as THE explanation) for a kind of rift that is part of human experience: a sense of a gap, a rupture, an absence. On the planet Eden, they understand this rift in terms of the severance of all contact between themselves and the rest of the human community on Earth, and their stories seek both to explain and, to some extent, to heal this rupture, much as Christian theology does (and, I guess, the theology of other religions too).

  17. Why isn’t this book available for kindle? I pre-ordered it and the order was canceled by amazon. I already have the first 2 books on kindle. Super frustrating as I don’t want a physical copy of the book to clutter up my tiny apt.

  18. If you are in US/Canada, this will be because the book hasn’t yet been published there (though it can be bought as an import from the UK. If you are somewhere else, let me know!

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